Royal Geographical

Mar 5, 2020 | Blog

In pursuit of all things estuarine I went to a conference at the Royal Geographical Society in London where there were some examples of engagement involving artists. I also found this amazing mural by Toni Llobet from Barcelona of the tide before and after. It really helps to visualize what is happening every time the tide comes in and out, a twice daily series of actions for a lot of creatures; hiding, feeding, migrating, waiting. Llobet’s work is particularly nice as it has subtle identifying labels.

overwintering

overwintering

Overwintering I   public rehearsals and performances late Feb/early March Community rehearsals: Thursday 29 Feb, Sunday 25 Feb Community performance Saturday 2 March all 6.30pm (Performance will include time on the estuary. Please contact us if you have any access...

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Alive Alive O! Part 2

Alive Alive O! Part 2

Mud is really the lungs of the river – Jason Ingham, inshore fisherman on the Exe Marine Larvae are attracted to sounds when they are looking for habitat – sound travels really well under water, it’s the best available cue. There is research that show that blue...

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Salmon Run 2023

Salmon Run 2023

SALMON RUN 2023 In one day, World Rivers Day, runners aged from 3 (on pushbike) to 72 took on a variety of challenges to empathise with the epic journey of the Atlantic salmon against the flow up the river Exe to the spawning grounds on Exmoor following the Exe Valley...

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Sea Temperature Part I

Sea Temperature Part I

We are delighted to share this blog post from Louise which weaves together threads of felt experience, citizen science, craft and care around the increasingly critical story of sea temperature. Jon Tinker from the Met Office who co-faciliated an online event with us:...

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Exe Trail Plankton Mural

Exe Trail Plankton Mural

Exe Trail plankton mural near Lympstone Back just before lockdown Tidelines worked with the Exe Estuary Managment Partnership to deliver a workshop at Lymsptone primary school. The kids looked at images of plankton and tiny creatures from the oceans and used a variety...

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Alive Alive 0! Part 1.

Alive Alive 0! Part 1.

ALIVE ALIVE O! Calling the Blue Mussel The mussel beds in the Exe are now badly depleted and many are wondering how we can restore the natural habitats of the Estuary. Adult mussels cannot move, but their larvae disperse through the water and can travel. Many species...

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The Salmon Run Day

The Salmon Run Day

The SALMON RUN DAY 8 relay sections, 7 changeover locations, 9 ceremonial invocations, many dates slices, several pubs by several lovely bridges, 74 runners and 50 miles over fields and down roads up and down hills and by the river, the salmon (Samantha) was passed...

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Singing the Sea & Alive Alive O!

Singing the Sea & Alive Alive O!

Singing the Sea & Alive Alive O!   Image: Plymouth University 2nd year Illustration students - Tidelines project Two projects connected by sound. Sound is different under the water. Water can carry sounds far further than air. What sounds can we hear? What...

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High Water: Tides, Climate, Oceans and The Exe estuary

High Water: Tides, Climate, Oceans and The Exe estuary

HIGH WATER EVENT: 30 March 2021 Sarah Cameron Sunde Tidelines partnered with Art-earth and Low Carbon Devon to run the High Water event where 60 artists and scientists and others from all round the Uk and the world talked about their work and relation to the oceans,...

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Maps and Tides at Marpool School, Exmouth

Maps and Tides at Marpool School, Exmouth

Tides and Maps at Marpool School How does the tide work? What shape is the eastuary? How does a map work? Who is it for? We explored such questions as these in 2 days of workshops with one class from Marpool school, one day on location by the estuary making...

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